The Natural and Social Conditions for Soil Nutrients: The Case of a Mediterranean Village in the 1860s

Authors

  • Elena Galán Department of Economic History, Institutions and Policy and World Economy, University of Barcelona, Spain
  • Enric Tello Department of Economic History, Institutions and Policy and World Economy, University of Barcelona, Spain

Abstract

Analysing the natural and social conditions for soil nutrients in the small Catalan village of Sentmenat during the 1860s, this interdisciplinary study aims to bridge the gap between history and ecology in order to draw lessons for sustainable agricultural systems from the pre-industrial era.

Author Biographies

Elena Galán, Department of Economic History, Institutions and Policy and World Economy, University of Barcelona, Spain

Elena Galán, B.A. and Master in Environmental Sciences at the Autonomous University of Barcelona (ICTA), and Predoc Research Scholar at the University of Barcelona, is preparing her PhD dissertation in Economic History on The End of Past Organic Agricultural Systems in Spain (1860-1960). She is developing the Manager of Energy and Nutrient Balances of Agricultural Systems (MENBAS), an accounting tool that will be soon offered as an Open Access resource at the University of Barcelona aimed at create a database on this issue able to perform international comparisons.

Enric Tello, Department of Economic History, Institutions and Policy and World Economy, University of Barcelona, Spain

Enric Tello, PhD in Geography and Contemporary History, is full professor and Head of the Department of Economic History and Institutions at the University of Barcelona, where he leads a transdisciplinary research group working on social metabolism and landscape ecology of past and present agricultural or urban systems. This project intends to understand the main socio-ecological transitions experienced in history, and also to identify their driving forces or ruling agencies in order to get useful knowledge to foster new sustainability-oriented transitions in future. It also aims to recover some traditional knowledge useful to develop retro-innovations for organic agriculture, more sustainable cities, or better landscapes.

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Published

2012-06-21

Issue

Section

Articles